AP EXAM FORMAT

NOTE: THIS PAGE WILL BE UPDATED TO REFLECT CHANGES MADE IN THE SUMMER OF 2017. NO BULL REVIEW HAS PUBLISHED A NEW EDITION WITH THE CHANGES.

 

DBQ HELP  

LONG ESSAY HELP. 

FORMAT OF NEW AP WORLD TEST

HISTORY REASONING SKILLS EXPLAINED

Continuity and Change Examples

Compare and Contrast Examples

Causes and Effects Examples 

RETURN TO AP WORLD REVIEW SHEET

 

 

 

 

 The format of the AP World History exam changed in the 2016-17 school year. The new test features more document analysis, and the connection of themes throughout World History. There are two sections, which include four separate tasks you need to address. The following pages contain the rubric updates and adjustments made in the summer of 2017.

 

Section I, Part A 55 multiple choice questions in 55 minutes.

Unlike the SAT Subject Test, there are only four choices, and the questions are based on documents. This section will count for 40% of your grade. See the document style multiple choice within each chapter of No Bull Review.

Section I, Part B Three Short Answer questions in 40 minutes.

These require brief written answers, not in full essay format. The following pages contain 20 examples of this type of question. The short answers will challenge you to select ONE, or TWO of the things you know the most about regarding the major themes of the course. Short answers could include primary and secondary sources, graphs or images. This section will count for 20% of your grade.

Section II, DBQ and Long Essay in 1 hour 40 minutes (60 minute DBQ, and 40 minute Long Essay).

You will be given a Document Based Question essay and a standard Long Essay. Both will be explained in the following pages. The DBQ makes up 25% of your grade, and the Long Essay is worth 15%.

 

 

The exam will test you on anything from c8000BCE to the present. Here are the six time frames:

Technological and Environmental Transformations (Before c600 BCE)
Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies (c600 BCE - c600 CE)
Regional and Transregional Interactions (c600 CE - c1450)
Global Interactions (c1450 - c1750)
 
Industrialization and Global Integration (c1750 - c1900)
Accelerating Global Change and Realignments (c1900 - Present)

 

All of the questions on the test will reflect one of the following themes:

Interaction Between Humans and the Environment (ENV) Understanding the interaction between people and their environment. People have been affected by, and have altered their environments. Examples include Neolithic Revolution, agriculture and pastoralism, terrace farming, climate affecting trade routes, global migration and pollution, expansion of empires, Little Ice Age, urbanization, and spread of disease.

Development and Interaction of Cultures (CUL) Understanding the origins of culture such as belief systems, philosophy, art, technology, and how one views themselves against others. Also, an understanding of cultural diffusion is key. Examples include religious beliefs, Greco-Roman philosophy, Social Darwinism, Enlightenment, nationalism, communism, globalization, and migration spreading culture and religion.

State Building, Expansion, and Conflict (SB) Understanding how systems of rule have been established, maintained, and have dealt with conflict over time. Examples include emergence of states, taxation, strength through trade, Meiji Era, Gunpowder Empires, governing over colonies, social hierarchies, nationalism, Cold War geopolitics, anti-imperialist movements, architecture and belief systems spreading, ethnic clashes, global war, and global interdependence.        

Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems (ECON) Understanding the utilization of environment to produce, distribute, and consume economic components. Examples include traditional economy, industrialization, capitalism, socialism, Global Economy, encomienda, slavery, Marxism, transnational banks, mercantilism, Columbian Exchange, oil and nuclear power, and Green Revolution.

Development and Transformation of Social Structures (SOC) Understanding relations between human beings, and hierarchies of gender, race, class, and wealth. Also, comprehending how social stratification has changed over time. Examples include gender hierarchy, caste system, Enlightenment ideals, nationalism, post-imperialism independence, migration, religious beliefs sustaining or challenging class, abolition of slavery, and suffrage rights.

 

DBQ HELP  

LONG ESSAY HELP. 

FORMAT OF NEW AP WORLD TEST

HISTORY REASONING SKILLS EXPLAINED

Continuity and Change Examples

Compare and Contrast Examples

Causes and Effects Examples 

RETURN TO AP WORLD REVIEW SHEET

  

 

 

 




                   

 

 

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